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Wellesley College News 

Entrrwl u iKond-claM matter Nornnber 17. 1916. at the Poat Office at Wellealey ltrnnrh, Bwbm. Mui . under the act of March 8, 1819. 



VOL. XXIX. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., JUNK 8, L921. 



No. 31 



SI REN1 <>i s EFFORTS M \I>K TO 

RAISE FUND QUOTA BT 

COMMENCEMENT 



Dr. Raymond Fosdick Speaks at Masa 
Meeting 



The Fund to date is $1,672,349.59. 
This includes the recent $75,000 gift 
from the Carnegie Foundation, but 
i nuts the $500,000 conditional sum 
promised by the General Educational 
rd. The Fund as it now stands is 
comprised of over 10 000 subscriptions 
of which about 9,000 have been made 
by Wellesley women. 

\> r is enthusiasm dead, despite the 
heroic work which has been in prog- 
ress since St. Valentine's Day. A 
giant mass meeting in New York on 
Wednesday, May 31, at which Mr. 
Raymond Fosdick was an inspiring 
speaker, attested the fact that no 
Wellesley woman will falter before 
the home stretch. 

On all sides there are evidences 
that there is more to our loyalty than 
a mere spurt. Grace Humphrey, '0o, 
has been toiling laboriously over four 
enormous books of clippings which 
will be exhibited at the college in 
June. These will not only show the 
activities of the publicity department-, 
under the able generalship of Emma 
MaeAlarney, but will also demon- 
strate what different Wellesley Clubs 
and individuals have done and are do- 
ing for the Fund. 

Among recent items chronicled is 
that of $500 cleared by the Washing- 
ton Wellesley Club at a benefit per- 
formance of the Wellesley films and 
"The Little Shepherd of Kingdom 

(Continued on page 4, col. 1) 



JUNIORS WIN FLOAT NIGHT 
CREW COMPETITION" 



Pageant Depicts Favorite Water 

Stories 



Float Night this year combined 
both the excitement of crew competi- 
tion and the beauty of exceptionally 
effective floats. Because it took plact 
on June third, the night before Open 
Tree Day. there was an unusually 
large number of outside guests pies- 
ent to witness the spirit of Wellesley 
as evidenced by the skill of the row- 
their hearty support from the 
classes on shore and the results of the 
work of the pageant committee. In- 
terest ran so high that few were driv- 
en away by the rain which unfortu- 
nately fell in the middle of the eve- 
ning. 

Crew Competition 

The crowd waited with expectancy 
until the crews appeared at 8:15, I 
'21. then '22, '28, and '21 rowed down 
the course, slowly and in their I 
form. In the race that followed the 



1921 Tree Day Symbaiizes Liberation of 

China 

Sister College at Yenching Portrayed in Elaborate Pageant 



The symbolism of the far east, thai. 
land of co'or and fantastic design, 
thrown into vivid relief by the spirit 
of Christianity and Yenching college, 
was the theme of 1921's Tree Day 
held on Tower Court green on Satur- 
day afternoon. June 4. The three un- 
dergraduate classes in their light 
dresses and the seniors in their caps 
and gowns wound down through the 
trees and across the green carrying 
the trailing laurel chain that has al- 
ways marked Wellesley's Tree Day. 
All together they sang the Alma 
Mater. Constance Whittemore, the 
senior president, then advanced in tht 
costume of old China, to invite the 
guests to join in "Wellesley's loving 
proof of her boundless sistei'hood with 
that little college of Yenching in the 
far east." 

A strain of music ushered in a 
dancing, flashing orange sprite, the 
Spirit of Light, impersonated hv 
Edith Carrol', 1921. Light footed. 
elusive, more a thing of the air and 
the sun than of the earth, she danced 
back and forth with the wind, fling- 
ing her orange scarf far behind. Slow- 
ly advanced the sinister figure of the 
Spirit of Darkness, represtented by 
Dorothy Stone, 1922. With quick. 
sinuous movements she seemed to be 
entangling with invisible cords the 
laughing spirit of Light, who, first 
gay and valiant, was soon driven, 
bound and drooping, from the green. 
Then began the triumph of Darkness, 
in a dance which, for grace and inter- 
pretative power was one of the most 
significant in the pageant. Moreover, 
her inteipretation of Davkness was 
sustained throughout the 'ong period 
that she was on the stage. Not once 
did her presence seem unnecessary or 
obtrusive. Soon the purple spirit ush- 
ered in Indolence, Oppression , and 



Superstition to join in the reckless 
freedom <>f swift triumph. The beau- 
t 'ful, slow movements and the per- 
fectly executed groupings of these 
dancers gave evidence of the skill and 
patience with which they had been 
trained. A delightful effect was cre- 
ated by their formation of a great 
semicircle about the temple, and the 
offering of bright red pots of incense 
as gifts to the Idol. 

The group dancing was gathered in- 
to a unified whole through an inter- 
pretation by Olive Shaw of the spirit 
of Oppression found in China during 
the dark centuries of ignorance. Her 
dancing showed an unusually high de- 
gree of technique and originality. This 
dance created an epoch in the develop- 
ment of Tree Day pageants. The del- 
icate, highly technical execution of the 
difficult steps involved in the interpre- 
tation of the dance showed a skill that 
is rarelv seen in aa amateur p>«r£»rm- 
ance. 

Following Darkness, the lords and 
ladies of China came slowly up to do 
homage to the Chinese Idol, represent- 
ed by Helen Cary, 1922. Reverently 
the bronze curtain?, of the Chinese 
temple were drawn aside and the Idol 
was revealed. Then in a weird, slow 
dance of strange posture, of long- 
drawn poses, sinister in effect, the 
Ido' interpreted the grotesque, almost 
terrifying religion of paganism. 
Then the legend tells us that "the 
lure of oriental luxury and the charms 
of the swaying idol had left only one 
spark of culture," when out of the 
distance came the shining figure of 
Christianity, impersonated by Eleanor 
Walden. 1921. A new reign of enlight- 
enment was initiated in the form of 
Yenching College, portrayed by the 

(Continued on page 3. col. 2) 



OUTING CLUBS TO BE FORMED 
NEXT YEAR 



FINAL COMPETITIONS HELD IN 
ALL SPORTS 



Minor Sports Will Be Organized 



Honors Divided Among Upper Classes 



(Continued on page 2. col. 2) 



In anticipation of an Outing Club 
for the coming year, Elizabeth Par- 
has been appointed chairman of 
the unorganized sports which would 
< -(institute such a club. The Athletic 
ociation plans to make this club 
pr< minent in an endeavor to stimulate 
greater interest and unity in the now 
unorganized activities, such as skiing, 
hiking, canoeing, and swimming. The 
chairman is eager for suggestions as 
to organization membership, and the 
methods of procedure for this club. 
Such suggestions may be sent to Eliz 

abeth Parsons before the close of Col 
lege or throughout the summer. 



Unusual excitement and inter-class 
rivalry marked the final competition 
in spring sports. The archery contest 
was won by the seniors. The juniors 
followed, with '24 as third. Esther 
phens, 21, made first place, witn 
the highest individual score of 124. 
The sophomores proved then- superior- 
ity in baseball by winning from the 
juniors who had previously beaten '21 
in a close game. The final basket- 
ball game was between '23 and '22. 
The juniors were victorious. In hock- 
ey, played Thursday. June 2, between 
the odd and even classes, '22 and '24 

made th" only score of the game. 



SENIORS LEAVE STEPS TO 1922 

AS CUM \\ OF TREE U\\ 

EVENTS 



Large Audience is Impressed b\ 21's 
Last Step Singing 



Another class passed down from the 
senior steps at Step Singing on Sat- 
urday evening, June 4, and a new se- 
nior class took its place. This event 
was the culmination of the Tree Day 
program, and a large crowd was pres- 
ent to enjoy the songs. The seniors in 
caps and gowns and the other cla 
in light colored dresses made an at- 
tractive picture and the singing was 
unusually good. 

It was '21's night, and the seniors, 
led by Virginia French, sang all the 
songs that belong to them, and 
cheered Constance Whittemore. Helen 
Cope, and their song leader. Mr. 
Morse, honorary member of the class, 
sat with them on the steps. The vil- 
lage seniors praised 1924 and gave the 
keys to the village to next year's 

Vice-president of College Government, 
i\/r_„ r - d — j 

The surprise promised for the « 
ning was the presence of a piano, and 
several old favorites from the song 
books were tried. Then each class 
sang its class, crew, and marching 
songs, and made an aisle down which 
1921 slowly marched, singing the Step 
Song. As they passed through the 
ranks of the sophomores, each senior 
was presented with a blue iris, the 
class flower. When their singing dud 
away in the distance, Nancy Toll led 
'22 to the senior steps while '23 and 
'24 took their new places, leaving an 
empty space for the next Wellesley 
class, 1925. 



CLOCK MARKS PROGRESS OF 
ENDOWMENT FUND 



Signboards are Erected in Front of 
Library and Ad. Building 



In order to record the progress of 

the Endowment. Fund, a large bright- 
ly-colored signboard has been erected 
near the Library. The hand of the 
dial has now reached a point very 
near $2,300,000. Below this, a racer 

with •'Wellesley $2,700,000" is -t 

ing along while the slogan below 
reads "Exceeding the speed limit." 
This signboard has been so pit 
that all of Wellesley's guests ma\ 

it and tberebj be given the incen 

to push the hand nearer to $2,700,000. 

On the side of the Ad Buildin 
' thermometer has been • 

to low the percentage of 
Fund contributions in each el. 

'21, '22. '2::. and '24 ai 
with 100 per cent and other classes 
are gradually "growing warm. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Wtlltehv College J^etosi 



EDITOR IN CHIEF 
ELIZABETH M. WOODY, 1922 
Associate Editor! 
BEATRICE JEFFERSON, 1922 
DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS, 1922 

Assistant Editors 
DOROTHEA COMLY, 1922 
MARGARET WATTERSON. 1922 
ELIZABETH ALLEN, 1923 
MARGARET HOOGS, 1923 
ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 
HELEN STAHL, 1923 
DANE VERMILION, 1923 
LOUISE CHILD. 1924 
BARBARA CONGER. 1924 
RUTH HELLER, 1924 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
SUSAN GRAFFAM, 1922 

Circulation Manager 

BARBARA BATES, 1922 

Assistant Circulation Manager 
LUCY JOHNSON, 1923 

Advertising Manager 
RUTH WHITE, 1923 

Assistant Managers 
MAY FALES. 1924 
ANNETTE WRIGHT, 1924 



Published weekly during the college year by a board of student* of Wellealey Colles*. 
Subscriptions one dollar and seventy-five cents per annum in advance. Single copies six 
cents each. All contributions should be in the News office by 9 P. M. on Sunday at the 
should be addressed to Miss E. M. Woody. All Alumna* news should be wat to 
Miss Laura Dwight, Wellesley College, Wellealey. Mass. All business communications and 
•ubscriptions should be sent to the Wellealey College News, Wellealey. Mass. 

Entered as second-class matter. October 10, 1919, at the Poat Office at Wellealey Branch. 
Boston. Mau., under the Act of March S. 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for in section 110S, Act of October 3, 1917. authorised October 80. 1919. 



MAUGUS PRESS. PRINTERS. WELLESLEY. MASi. 



"A CONSUMMATION DEVOUTLY 
TO BE WISHED" 



While the college was striving in 
Tree Day to express pictorially the 
lofty character of its achievements, it 
was unconsciously calling attention to 
one virtue which it does not possess; 
namely, punctuality. Doubtless the 
outside guests who had attended pre- 
vious Wellesley functions (especially 
Float Nights) did not expect to wit- 
ness an exhibition of this estimable 
quality, and would have been rather 
surprised than otherwise if the per- 
formance had begun at the time foi. 
which it was scheduled. 

Only irreclaimable optimists expect 
college affairs to begin promptly, and 
even they must have had their faith 
somewhat shattered Saturday after- 
noon. We do not mean to imply, 
however, that lack of punctuality is a 
deficiency peculiar to 1921's Tree Day: 
Unfortunately it has branded college 
performances from time immemorial. 

We would suggest that the tradition 
is now a bit out-worn and may be dis- 
carded with advantage. College guests 
cannot fail to enjoy Commencement 
entertainments which begin on time 
more than those marked by lengthy 
and tiring delays. Surely it is not too 
much to ask the college to make an 
especial effort during Commencement 
week to begin activities on time. 



ree 



ress 



Col 



umn 



All contributions for this column must be 
signed with the full name of the author. Only 
articles thus signed will be printed. Initials 
er numerals will be used in printing the ar- 
ticles if the writer so desires. 

The Editors do not hold themselves respon- 
sible for opinions and statements which appear 
in this column. 

Contributions should be in the hands of the 
Editors by 9 P. M. on Sunday. 

Contributions must be as brief as possible. 



large crowds of outside guests wait- 
ing cheerfully for a college perform- 
ance to begin? Or is it simply a 
complacent disregard of their feelings 
and opinions? 

Whatever our attitude is, it was 
well illustrated on Tree Day. 

Several performers assert that they 
were all ready to begin at two o'clock. 
Tickets announced the hour as three- 
thirty. Yet the performance did not 
get under way until after four, and 
hundreds of guests were sitting out 
in the sun, making who-knows-what 
remarks. It is said that the delay 
was chargeable to the need of censor- 
ing make-up and costumes. At any 
rate, the classes as a whole were not 
lesponsible for it, for they assembled 
in force long ere the hour at which 
the pageant began. 

In the evening, again, the same sto- 
ry was repeated, to substantially the 
same audience. An interval of at 
least forty-five minutes elapsed while 
inaudible awards of W's took place. 
There was little to divert the crowd 
during this period, although, to give 
them due credit, they were admirably 
patient. 

That very patience, however, is only 
one of many reasons why we should 
not tax it. College visitors compose 
the most sympathetic and enthusiastic 
of audiences. They are slow to dis- 
parage, and quick to appreciate any 
entertainment. We could not extend 
ourselves to better purpose than in 
trying to give them our best, and to 
give it on time. 

'22 



JUNIORS WIN FLOAT NIGHT 
CREW COMPETITION 



(Continued from page 1, col 1) 



KEEPING THEM WAITING 



Is conceit the motive which flatters 
us into supposing that we can keep 



four shells were unusually evenly 
matched. '24's boat proved the fast- 
est. Speed, however, was secondary 
to form, and '22 showed herself su- 
perior in the latter. 



Awarding of Cups and W's 

The awarding of cups and presenta- 
tion of W's, by Maude Ludington, 
president of the Athletic Association, 
came after the competition. Janet 
Travell was awarded a cup, as the 
winner of the spring tournament in 
tennis singles, and received a second, 
with her sister, Virginia Travell, as a 
trophy of the doubles tournament. 
The decision of the judges of the 
crew competition, Mrs. TJleanor Hun- 
ter Brown, Wellesley 1915, Dr. Fos- 
ter Kellog, and Mr. Ralph W. Mulli- 
gan, was then announced. The juniors 
held first place, with 91 points; the 
seniors second, with 87; the freshmen 
third, with 84; and the sophomores 
fourth, with 76. 

Elizabeth Congdon, as captain of 
the winning crew, received a cup. 
Gladys Hathaway., '21, was then pre- 
sented with the cup sent by Elizabeth 
Shipman, '19, to be given to the best 
carswoman on the lake. 

W's were given to the following 
members of the crew, in recognition 
of skill, good discipline, and high 
academic standing: from '21, Dorothy 
Brainerd, Gladys Hathaway, Jeannette 
Luther, Helen Sherman, Mildred 
Hesse, Marion Smith; from '22, Lu- 
cille Barrett, Elizabeth Beahan, Har- 
riet Rathbun. Mildred Durant, Doro- 
thy Breingan; from '23, Miriam 
Mayne. 

Helen Sherman, head of rowing, 
was awarded a sweater with an Old 
English W. This is the sixth given 
this year, and is the highest athletic 
honor attainable at Wellesley. It rep- 
resents eighty athletic points, high 
academic standing, good health, and 
college spirit. 

The usual formation of the W by 
the four boats and the singing of the 
three crew songs followed. The fresh- 
man boat was christened Kanaloa, 
goddess of lightning. 

Water Pageant 
The pageant, which was more elab- 
orate than usual, came towards the 
end of the evening. This part of the 
Float Night program, which is always 
the most beautiful and usually the 
most enjoyed by outside guests who 
are not vitally interested in the crew, 
and who become tired by the long 
pauses in that part of the program, 
deserves a more prominent place in 
Float Night than it now has. The 
floats this year proved the very beau- 
tiful and artistic effects that can be 
achieved. 

The pageant represented the dreams 
of a little child, who fell asleep after 
an afternoon spent in reading won- 
drous fairy tales of "shores beyond 
the moon, of crystal caves and an- 
cient seas." First came Father Nep- 
tune, who in turn summoned his wa- 
ter-sprites to bring dreams to the lit- 
tle girl. The Neptune float, in charge 
of Helen Baxter. '23, showed the 
stately old monarch sitting on his 
dragon-shaped throne. 

After him followed the Owl and the 
Pussycat, on their way to sea in a 
"beautiful, elegant pea-green boat," 
the Owl strumming calmly on his 
mandolin while the very realistic 
Pussycat rowed. The little girl's next 
dream was of Tom, the sooty chimney 



sweep, under the sea with all the wa- 
ter creatures surrounding him. Erne- 
line Day, '22, as Tom, seemed to be 
truly beneath the water, because of 
the very clever arrangement of the 
float and the excellent manner of 
lighting it. 

Above the waves and on a desert 
island stood Robinson Crusoe's hut, 
with Crusoe himself cooking dinne- 
over a fire, and his man Friday, at- 
tired in yellow,, looking on apprecia- 
tively. The two parts were taken re- 
spectively by Marjorie Osgood, '22, and 
Eleanor Johnson, '23; Margaret Car- 
ter, '22, had charge of the float. 

Among the most realistic of them 
all was that of the tiny Thumbelina 
being blown down stream on a leaf, 
with her only companion a glow worm. 
Margaret Babb, who took the part of 
the little maiden only the height of 
one's thumb, also had charge of the 
float. 

Edith Brandt. '23, was in charge of 
the float of the moon princess. The sto- 
ry goes that the beautiful moon prin- 
cess has a sister who lives in a glass 
palace under the .sea, and whenever 
the moon dips down below the water's 
edge, the moon princess is going to 
visit her sister. 

The float of the Ice sister and the 
Fire brother presented another very 
effective picture. The Ice sister, sit- 
ting among her icicles in the back- 
ground, and the Fire brother bending 
over his beloved flames suggested the 
sad fate of these two widely different 
beings who loved each other dearly. 

Sinbad, the sailor, cast away in the 
val'ey of diamonds, encountered a 
huge roc while he was climbing the 
cliff to get the largest diamond of all. 
He appeared on a float, scaling the 
rocks, with the menacing bird above. 

Hi'degarde Chjsrchill, as the bea'» 
tiful, heartless Lorelei, came gliding 
by, combing her hair and singing hei 
siren song. To add a touch of real- 
ism, there was a bit of shipwreck at 
the foot of her cliff, a suggestion of 
the many lives she had lured to de- 
struction. 

Still another float was that under 
the charge of Katharine Stone, '22. It 
was the scene of the little mermaid at 
the cave of the sea witch, who was 
brewing a potion to turn the maiden's 
silver tail into two white feet, so that 
she might go up on the earth to her 
human lover. 

The last float was a scene from Un- 
dine. Olive Ladd as Undine was sup- 
posed to be coming forth from the 
fountain, made of sparklers, to find 
the knight (Isabel Dietrich), her 
former husband. 

Nothing more artistic has been seei. 
at Wellesley throughout the year than 
the Float Night pageant. Congratula- 
tions are due to Ethel Halsey, '22, 
chairman of the float committee. Har- 
riet Cavis also deserves a share in the 
praise, for to her belongs the credit 
for the beautiful lighting effects 
which the float committee has for 
years been trying to obtain. Such 
success in the floats proves one more 
Wellesley tradition very worth while. 

The program was closed by the 
varsity crew, which rowed out of the 
shadows and across Lake Waban. 



[•HE WKI.LESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




Blouses, 
Suits, Gowns, 

Skirts, Coats, 
Sweaters, 

SilkPetticoats 
and Furs. 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

BOSTON 
Treniont 1 1 ■ 1 < 1 Boylston 8ts. 



Wriffht & Ditson 

Athletic House 

TENNIS BALLS. 

RACKETS-DAVIS CUP. 

GOLD STAR AND WW MODELS. 

TENNIS SHOES. 

RAl KKI> Kf.SlIU NG. 

SWEATERS. 

WHITE DICK HATS. 

SKIRTS. SHIRTS, STOCKINGS. 



TREE DAY SYMBOLIZES 
LIBERATION OF CHINA 



(Continued from page 1, col. 2) 



SPORT CLOTHING FOR GIRLS 

(Second floor) 

•>44 Washington St., Boston. 

SHORTHAND 

SYSTEM 

IN TEN 

EASY LESSONS 



This course covers ten easy lessons which wlU 
enable the Student. Professor. Journalist, Doc- 
tor. Lawyer or anyone seeking a professional 
career. U. go thru life with 100 per cent effi- 
cient. 



THIS COURSE 



Freshman Tree Day Mistress, Mary- 
Crawford, who was brought across 
the green in a sedan chair. Yenching 
felt herself weak and ineffective until 
suddenly the spirit of Wellesley, Helen 
Miller, 1921, entered in the distance. 
At first, this vision from a far-off 
country seemed more like a glimpse 
of fairyland than a reality, but as 
Wellesley drew nearer the truth of 
her ideals gleamed forth in the repre- 
sentations of Knowledge, Liberty, Ser- 
vice, and Love. The vision of Welles- 
ley was attended by her aides, the 
four undergraduate classes, wearing 
pastel colors in delicate harmony with 
the iridescent whiteness of the figure 
of Wellesley. The Spirit of Lib- 
erty, Adolphia Katsky, 1923, broke 
the bonds of ignorance and brought to 
Yenching a new freedom. The Spirit 
of Love was represented by Marjorie 
Walsh, 1923, a dainty winged figure, 

CAPE COD TEA 

Rooms, Inns, Lodges, Hotels for 
sale, lease or rent. Will 'pay big prof, 
it this summer. 

Also 5 to 6 room and bath cottages 
built to order where you wish it on 
Cape Cod, $3500 complete. 
Particulars write: 

IVAN L. MARTIN, 

Yarmouth, Mass. 



ANDREW J. LLOYD CO. 

Is short and inexpensive, and is given with _, 

a mon« back B uarantee if not satisfied. '"e Andrew J. Lloyd Company store 
SEND THIS CLIPPING TODAY at 75 Summer Street, Boston, is very 
pyramid press: publishers conveniently located for Wellesley Col- 
1411 Broadway. le Ke students. At this store you will 
N.w Y»rk City find al! sorts of eyeglasses and spec- 
Gentlemen— Enclosed herewith is is.oo for tacles, especially the student's shell 
which kindly send me your »|«Tthand cours. spectacles, kodaks, films, developing 

in ten easy lessons by mail. It is understood ' «.•«>#••.», 

that at the end of five days. I am not satis- and printing, student's fountain pens, 

fled my money will b« gladly refunded. y,„„„;i., — - • n is. i • j iu .1 

pencils especially the kind with the 

ring to be worn with a cord or ribbon. 

Bird Glasses, in fact, everything in 
Btrw , t the optica! line. Other stores at 315 

Washington Street, 165 Tremont 
City aa« Stau Street, 310 Boylston Street. Adv. 



the epitome "f grace and of light joy 
ousness, with the underlying serious- 
ness of love throwing a trace of pen 

shadow over her interpretation. 

When the true reign of light had 
been inaugurated, the Spirit of Yen- 
ching College, Virginia Beresford, 
1924, received the symbol of the new 
era from the Spirit of Wellesley Col- 
lege, Ksther Rolfe, L928. The spade 
was presented to Marjorie Wrighv, 
president of the freshman class, and 
freshmen and sophomores ran across 
the green to the slope near Longfel- 
low Pond where the red oak, 1924's 
class tree, was planted. There, for the 
first time, '21 gave her class song and 
cheer, and the ceremony of Tree Day 
was ended. 

A great deal of credit for the suc- 
cess of Tree Day goes to Helen Cope, 
the general chairman, and her com- 
mittee; to Olive Shaw, director of 
dancing; and to Sibyl Wardwell, 
chairman of costumes. The beautiful 
arrangement of the temple and the ar- 
tistic harmony of the costumes for the 
Indolence group deserve especial men- 
tion. The Chinese girls, both as ac- 
tors and as invaluable assistants in the 
production contributed largely to the 
success of the pageant. The commit- 
tee also wishes to thank the girls who 
were kind enough to furnish music at 
rehearsals, thus adding immeasurably 
to the amount of work that could be 
accomplished in a single practice. Tht 
committees are as followss: 
Committee on Plans 

Helen Cope, 1921, Chairman 

Lucile Barrett, 192^ 

Ethel Halsey, 1922 

Helen Lane, 1923 

Executive Committee 

Sibyl Wardwell, Costumes 

Olive Shaw, Dancing 

Ruth Cushing, Music 

.Madeline Cassidy, Properties 

Caroline Chaffee, General Arrange- 
ments 

Edith Rowse, Finance 

Margaret Beachem, Printing 

Amy Carpenter, 1924, Consulting 
Member 



NON-AL1 \l\ \l MEMBERS OF 

THE FACULTY CONTRIBUTE 

TO FUND 



An interesting phase of the Drive 
for the Semi-Centennial Fund is 
shown in the figures, submitted by 
Mr. Macdougall, which enumerate 
the contributions of members of the 
faculty who are not alumnae of the 
college. The following figures ex- 
press their cooperation not only in 
spirit but also in tangible figures. 
Total cash contributions $1301.11 

Interest 3.02 

Cheque to Headqu'a |1282.18 
Printing. Postage Stationery, 

etc., 22.00 



$1304.13 $1304.13 

Pledges from non-Wellesley Faculty: 

One at 250.00 

One at 200.00 

Two at $100 200.00 

Two at $50 100.00 

One at $25 25.00 



$775.00 



Partial payments on pledges, 
deduct 16.00 



$759.00 

Pledge made elsewhere, but 

allowed to be credited here, 

550.00 



$1309.00 

Add cheque to Headquarters, 

1282.13 



$2591.13 
Additional contribution, 

56.00 



Total 



$2647.13 
Hamilton C. Macdougall. 



COLLEGE NOTE 

Saturday morning, June 4, the Hy- 
giene juniors and seniors contested in 
track, baseball, and hockey. The se- 
niors won track. The final score of 
the meet, 63 - 28, was in favor of the 
seniors. 



HATS 



For dress and sport — summer hats 
for summer wear, in every new fabric 
and design. 

Come in when you are in town. 



BOSTON 
Sixty-five — Sixty-nine Summer Street 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




Correct Fasfiionf for Women a^Jflisjes. 

372-378 Boybton Street. Bojton,41ax/acliusetb 



EFFORT MADE TO RAISE FUND 
QUOTA 



(Continued from page 1, col. 1) 



Come." The same organization re- 
ported $600 from Tony Sarg's marion- 
ettes and $6000 as a result of Edith 
Wynne Matthison's performance of 
Ekctra for which Mrs. Charles Evans 
Hughes sold the boxes. 

During the Bethlehem Bach Festi- 

\ul, BffTrtBHl I'e Long mj successf ally 
operated a taxi service that she is to 
continue it during the summer. In- 
deed, she hopes that everyone passing 
through Pennsylvania will hire hei 



SIX 

GILLETTE 

BLADES 

WITH 

HOLDER 

$1.25 

PREPAID 
In Attractive Case 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 
or Money Refunded 

This offer for a limited 
time only. 

Remit by money order 
or cash — (no stamps) 



FRAD RAZOR CO. 

1475 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 



car for at least half a day. Elizabeth 
Cast'e, '07, head of the Dana Hall 
science department, is running a sim- 
ilar taxi service in Wellesley. 

Dorothy Greene, '13, 500 West 114th 
St.. New York, sells attractive hand- 
kerchiefs with applique and tiny em- 
broidered flowers, just the right thing 
to add distinction to any frock. These 
may be obtained for $1.50 and $1.75, 
and are splendid for a Commencement 
gift. There are initialed handker- 
cmeis ior men, too, at $z.75 and $3.00. 

During Commencement the Campus 
will be the habitat of a Bazaar! Prof- 
its will go directly to the Fund 
through the individuals or groups sol- 
iciting orders. All articles for sale, 
marked with price and owner's name 
and address, should be forwarded at 
once to Chairman of Ideas Bazaar 
Alumnae Office, Wellesley. 

Nearly two hundred persons at- 

Feed Your Family 

AT 

Fund Food Shop 

June 16-21. 11 A. M. to 7 P. M. 

Room 24 Ad. Building 

Cold drinks, salad, ice cream and 

Sandwiches 

THE PLYMOUTH INTIQUARIAN 
SOCIETY calls your attention to their 
fine Old House, 83 Court Street, where 
they exhibit a collection of furniture, 
china and costumes of the early 19th 
century. Rest rooms, open piazzas 
and ample grounds for our visitors. 
In the Antiquarian House are Tea 
Rooms where luncheons, suppers, din- 
ners and teas are served. Waffle Teas 
from '■'< to 7. Southern chicken din- 
ners or lobster are served when or- 
dered ahead. 

Phone Plymouth 853-W. Adv. 



tended the Washington banquet in 
honor of President Pendleton, on May 
21st. Miss Pendleton's class flower, 
the daisy, was used with effectiveness. 

And speaking of President Pendle- 
ton, Wellesley women have never 
been more proud of her than on May 
18, in Carnegie Hall, when she pre- 
sented the Ellen Richards Memorial 
Prize of $2000 to Madame Curie. 
Among several excellent speeches by 
notable women, hers stood out as a 
gem of graciousness, conciseness and 
pertinence. After its conclusion, 
Madame Curie confided in a friend 
that she had not intended to visit 
Wellesley, but now wished to see the 
college which had produced IVfss Pen- 
dleton. 

Many interesting points were made 
by other speakers. One of the most 
suggestive of the talks was that of 
Dr. Alice Hamilton, Government in- 
vestigator of industrial poisons and 
Associate of Industrial Hygiene at 
Harvard. Dr. Hamilton stressed the 
fact that research in industrial poisons 
such as lead, dusts, and fatigue is an. 
excellent profession for women since 
they have a greater sense of the valut 
cf life than men. 

Excellent as the speeches were, one 
felt that they had every reason to be 
inspired. The picture was not to be 
forgotten. An immense auditorium 



hung with college banners and filled 
with college women; a great stage 
banked with lilies of France where 
gowned university women of distinc- 
tion were seated; frail Madame Curie 
trying to express how deeply the 
greeting had affected her. It was in 
deed a glorious meeting. Next to 
President Pendleton's speech and the 
singing of the Vassar choir, Madame 
Curie seemed most interested in the 
undergraduates who filed past her,, de- 
positing lilies of France in the bowl 
at her side. Introducing this number 
of the program, Dean Comstock, 
of Smith, said rather whimsically 
that colleges were usually represent- 
ed by football teams, rarely by their 
students, but -for once the order was 
being varied. The eagerness with 
which Madame Curie watched the se- 
lected students of chemistry who sa- 
luted her showed that her desire to be 
known as a teacher rather than a 
chemist was not entirely a publicity 
myth. 

Mme. Curie's indefatigible research 
stands as an evidence of the value of 
college training for women. But 
proper training costs money and Wel- 
lesley does not yet possess the re- 
quired amount to continue its work. 
Pledges must be doubled! President 
Pendleton should be able to announce 
three million at Commencement. 



Dainty blew Styles in 

Misses 



5ilk 
Waists 




JAP SILK SPORT 

WAIST, $7.50 

Round collar model. The frilled 

round collar and turnback cuffs 

are of dainty colored checked 

silk. 

GEORGETTE TIE-BACK 
BLOUSE. $8.50 

Novelty cross bar tucking trims 
the square collar, turn-back 
cuffs and tie-back girdle. 

JABOT FRILL 
GEORGETTE WAIST, $9.50 

Tie-back model of fine quality 
georgette, with saw edged frill 
of contrasting color. 



Sketched 

CREPE DE CHINE 
WAIST, $7.95 

Roll collar model, with tucked 
bosom, and turn-back cuffs with 
narrow fluting. 

QUAKER COLLAR 
GEORGETTE WAIST, $12.50 

Wide insertion of real filet 
short sleeves and self sash. 

FRILLED GEORGETTE 
WAIST, $7.95 

Wide knife-pleated ruff at neck, 
and smart turned back cuffs 
with narrow frill. Tucked vest. 



Shown in the Misses' Section of our Waist Dept., which is devoted 
exclusively to youthful models. 

fllhanirtcr & Oto. 



Tremont St., Near W est, Boston 11 



THE VVELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Thresher Bros. 

The Specialty Silk Store" 

15, 17, 19 TEMPLE PLACE 

Through to 41 West Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 

SILKS! SILKS! SILKS 

For Street Wear For Sport Wear 

For Evening Wear For Underwear 

For E% - erywear 

Also 

Chiffon Velvets, Velveteens, Corduroys 

and Plushes 

Woolen Dress Goods 

Silk and Lingerie Blouses 

Silk Petticoats 

Thresher Bros. 

"The Specialty Silk Store" 
15. 17, 19, TEMPLE PLACE 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Through to 41 West Street 



DR. STANLEY E. HALL 

DEXTIST 

The Waban Wellesley, Mass. 

Telephone 566-W 



AC A \I FASHIONABLE 
• VJ/-\1N LADIES' TAILOR 

Cleansing, Pressing and Mending. 
All kinds of furs relined and re- 
modeled. 



CAPE COD CAPTAINS 

home, a fine furnished house, over- 
looking ocean. F'rice only $6500. 
Write for Photo. 

IVAN L. MARTIN, 
Yarmouth, Mass. 



RECREATION TRAINING 
SCHOOL OF CHICAGO 

Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy). 

One Year Course in Recreation and 
New School of Dramatics and Pageantry 
800 S. Halsted St.. (Hull House), Chicago 



TAXI SERVICE 

Baggage Transfer 



Perkins Garage 

SUMNER FROST, Proprietor 



69 Central 8t, W«ll«a!«y, 

Telephone 
Wellesley 409 



CARS STORED. Let us store 

your car for you in our new 

modern Garage. Cart washed 
and polished. 




THE- PARLIAMENT- OF- FOOLS 



AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCE- 
MENT 



Dog Out, 
Chapel Basement, 
June 9, L921. 
Dear Readers: — 

It js a long time since I unseated 
to abandon my home in the Natiek 
Hot Do? Cart for a kennel in the 
Chapel Basement. Yes, my friends, 
it is indeed a long time since I came 
here imbued with a dogged determina- 
tion to pull the P. of F. out of the 
mire with my firm canines; I was re- 
solved to become a successful wag, to 
write witty rebarks and entertaining 
doggerel. For a time, true, I was 
lauded even by the News Board until 
doggone it, something happened. 
Whether they became jealous of my 
literary achievement in "Mange 
Street" or of my high barks at Mid- 
years, I shall never discover. Certain 
it is, however, that I did in-cur their 
entire lack of appreciation. They col- 
lahed me, they muzzled my every ef- 
fort, they everlastingly found a bone 
to pick with me. 

I finally succumbed to a nervous 
breakdown and my life was very near- 
ly cur-tailed in its innocent puppy- 
hood. During these beautiful spring 
days however, I have become such a 
premising convalescent that I was 
permitted one day last week to wan- 
der around Campus. It happened 
that as I was proceeding down the 
Lake Path at a dog-trot, a group of 
weary girls on the track of a Botany 
instructor approached me and inquired 
the time of day. I was able to tell 
them by a glance at my dog watch. 
As they were discussing in loud tones 
the probable locality of the dog rose, 
dogbane, dogwood, and dog-tooth vio- 
let, I eagerly followed them as far as 
the Chapel and then — lured in spite of 
myself to my old kennel, I entered the 
News Office. What was my amaze- 
mene to be greeted in husky tones by 
all the Editors with the news that my 
memory was to be eternally kept 
young in a "News charm" to be worn 
by the entire staff! 

Such is the reward of merit. The 
charms will undoubtedly be finished 
before the dog days. Be on the look- 
out for them, dear readers! 

Wienie, vidi, vici! 

Adonais. 



MORN AT WELLESLEY 

(Aftei the .Manner of Alex. Pope) 

As when a doe, by crudest hunter 

chas'd, 
Leaps from the fern and beats it in 

great haste, 
Thus doth the morning of a coll 

girl 
Begin. She springs to breakfast in a 

whirl. 
With face unwashen and with eye uri- 

op'd 
She tears into the shredded wheat or 

oat 
Garnered from Nature's gran-but let 

that pass, 
We've gotta get her to th'eight-forty 

class. 
Come, fairies, and with gauzy flutters 

bring 
A grievously misshapen, woolly thing. 
This is the cloak which sheathes her 

everywhere, 
A Spaulding sweater, much the worse 

for wear. 
No shame she shows this gruesome 

thing to don — 
Baglike, as though a hippo'd had it 

on. 
Now Mercury, with winged, swift 

galosh, 
Attend the maiden as she runs, (Mi- 

gosh! 
She's come a cropper down that steep 

Quad hill! 
But upward, onward. — mad enough to 

kill.) 
Come gentle Melancholy, perch on 

Founders Hall. 
And hover o'er the maiden, now in 

thrall 
To Knowledge, throned in state before 

the mass. 
Quizzing with piercing eye the stolid 

class. 
At length the bell terrific doth re- 
sound; 
Up rise the scholars with ye gladsome 

bound ; 
The door from off its hinge they well- 
nigh tear, 
And Wisdom's sentence dangles in 

mid-air. 



CAPE COD COTTAGE 
beautiful location, historic house, fire- 
places, acre of land. Price only 2800. 
Phot and particulars. Have best 
places on Cape Cod. 

IVAN L. MARTIN, 
Yarmouth, Mass. 



YOUR PICTURE! 

Make the appointment now, bring your smile with you 
SITTINGE MADE MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS. THURSDAYS 



$5.00 for one dozen or $5.00 for one. 
ing to finish. 



Other styles priced accord- 



SUE RICE STUDIO 

I'hone Wei. 130. \Q Grove St. 



Treo Girdles 
at 

MADAME 

WHITNEY'S 

Up One Fliftht 
The Waban B'dg. Wellesley Sq 

also 

Fine Dress and 

Dancing Corsets 
Carefully fitted 

Lovely Lingerie and 

Beautiful Novelties 

for Gifts 

OLD NATICK INN, 

South Natiek, Mass. 

Large, comfortable rooms. 

Suite.s with bath. Excellent table. 

Garage accommodations. 

Seventeen miles from Boston. 

Tel. Natiek 8610 Miss Harris. Mgr. 

3fn? f erriT pimrmartj 

Hallet E. Jones, Prop. 

No. 1 Clark's Block, Natiek, Mass. 

DRUGS OF QUALITY 

— GEAGHAN 



- t 



WELLESLEY STUDIO 
and 
FRAME SHOP 



Summer and Sport Hats 

New Variety of New Styles 

Visit the 

WELLESLEY MILLINERY SHOP 

Opposite the Inn. 



OfC 



ourse 



WE 
HAVE 
THE 
BEST 



The 

Wellesley 
Fruit 
Co. 

Free Delivery Tel. 138-W 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



alumnae Bept 



CALENDAR 



MARRIED 



'10 Dr. Katherine Julia Scott to 
Tyndall Bishop of San Francisco, in 
May, at Berkeley, California. 

'11 Margaret Dunlap Newton to 
Joseph Marion Forsythe, May 17, at 
Norwich, N. Y. At home, 187 No. 
Broad St., Norwich, N. Y. 

'16 Madeleine Blake to Erie Avery 
Bishop, June 4, at Melrose, Mass. At 
home, Strathcona Hall, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

'19 Isabel Stoddard Williams to 
Mathew Branch Porter, Jr., June 1, at 
Glastonbury, Conn. At home, 617 
Hawthorne Ave., Richmond, Va. 



BORN 



'11 To Florence (Copeland) Yates, 
a daughter and second child, Ruth, 
March 27, in Parnassus, Pa. 

'17 To Ruth (Fowler) Oliver, a 
daughter, Ruth, March 7, at New 
Haven, Conn. 



DIED 



'15 Rev. Thomas Davidson Christie, 
father of Jean Christie, May 25, at 
Pasadena, California. 



CHANGES OF ADDRESS 



'95 Flora (Krum) Harding to Vine- 
yard Haven, Mass. 

'15 Jean Christie to 1761 No. Fair 
Oaks Ave., Pasadena, California. 

'20 Estella (Frink) Barrett to R. F. 
D., 2, Putnam, Connecticut. 



Wonderful 
Shoes 



FOR 



Wonderful 
Girls 




Gray Suede 
Brown Suede 
Black Satin 
Tan Russia Calf 
White Kid 

Baby Louis Heels 

In our new second floor department 
for Girls 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

32 Watt Stre«t 



June 12, 11 A. M. — Chapel, Preach- 
er, Dr. Wm. P. Merrill. 

June 15. 7:45 P. M. — Barn, Japan- 
ese Plays. 

June 16, 8:45 P. M.— Tupelo, June 
Play. 

June 18 — Alternate date for June 
Play. 

3:30 P. M.— Noi-umbega Hill, Pres- 
ident's Reception, followed by Garden 
Party, and Senior Dances. 

June 19, Baccalaureate Sunday, 11 
A. M. — Memorial Chapel, Preacher, 
Dr. Theodore G. Loares of Chicago. 

7:30 P. M. Baccalaureate Vespers — 
Admission to both by ticket only. 

4:00 P. M., Chapel— Hour of Music. 
No tickets required. 

June 20, 11 A. M., Memorial Chapel, 
— Commencement Exercises. Address 
by Mr. Gutzon Borglum, of New 
York. 

1:00 P. M., Tower Court Hill — 
Trustee-Alumnae Luncheon. 
June 21 — Alumnae Day. 




^fovti&id 




FOR 



Commencement 



Flowers meet every social need. 
Without their luster, fragrance and 
charm, June functions are bound to 
be dull and lifeless. 

Consult us, we can supply all your 
requirements to your complete satis- 
faction. 




THE FLORIST 



65 Linden Street, Wellesley. 
Telephone 597. 



For Vacation Wear! 

Misses White Flannel Skirts 
and Jersey Jackets 

QV r TDnTC very stylishly mad 
01>wir\. 1 O Knife Pleating. £ 

$12.50 



e with Box Side or 
Specially priced. 



T A /~'L- r XT" TO suitable to wear with any sports skirt. 
J/"W^rvL. * "^ Made with a Tuxedo front and pinched 



back. Colors: Navy, Black and Brown. 

Specially priced. 



$8.00 



Jordan Marsh Company 




FRANK BROTHERS 

Fifth Avenue Boot Shop 

Near Forty-Eighth Street, New York 

Boots, Slippers, Hosiery for Men, 

Women and Children 



BOSTON 



Tremont and Boylston Sts. 
Little Building 



CHICAGO 
Michigan Blvd. Bids, 
corner Washington St. 

ST. LOUIS 
Arcade Building 



NEW HAVEN 

Hotel Taft 

PITTSBURGH 

Jenkins Arcade 

CLEVELAND 

Athletic Club Building 



WASHINGTON 

Woodward Building 

opp. Shoreham Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Whitney Building 

133 Geary Street 



TO LET 

Rooms for Guests 

All Modern Conveniences 

Breakfast served from 7 :30 to 9 

Room for 2 Cars 

Tel. Wei. 741-M., Call at 200 Grove St. 

Wellesley. 



CATERING 







C. M. McKechnie & Co. 

10 Main St. 

Natick, Mass., Tel. Natick 52 



BAKING PRODUCTS 
ICE CREAMS & ICES OF 
EXCEPTIONAL QUALITY 

Excellent Equipment 

for Large or Small Parties 

Society Dinners 

Class Banquets 

Receptions 

Pit Parties 

Delivery Prompt & Free 



A. B. HAYDEN 

Wellesley Square 
Gifts that last. 

Solid gold and silver novelties. 
WATCHES and JEWELRY repaired. 

LOST — On campus, May 14th, small 
mink neckpiece trimmed with head 
and three tails. Finder please return 
to I. Gibson, 97 Pinckney St., Boston, 
for reward. 

"Pickard China'' 
for the June Wedding 

at the 

Gift Room 

of the 

The Yarn Shop 

Waban Block 



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